English & Welsh Martyrs

English & Welsh Martyrs of the Reformation were put to death for the faith. They were all canonised on 25 October 1970, by Pope Paul VI.

Right back to Saint Jude, who was one of the first Christiain martyrs, there have been many martyrs of the faith - men and women - who have died for their faith in Christ. In the UK and western world, we are lucky that we can enjoy our religious beliefs freely, but throughout the world, there are many who cannot. So, today we pray for all Christians that are persecuted. May each of us be more accepting of other faiths and beliefs.

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Biographical Register of Carmelites in England and Wales 1240 - 1540

Writing in 1536, at the start of the English Reformation, the former Carmelite friar John Bale spoke admiringly of the early members of that religious order: 'The sons of Elijah were poor hermits of small repute among men, humble, retiring...They were endowed with the Holy Spirit of fervent devotion, occupied in contemplation of God... from among them came many who were wise and learned men'. Bale went on to accuse his contemporary Carmelites of declining zeal: 'They came to the notice of princes, put on airs and graces...rewarded with honors and titles, enriched with gifts... ambitious, proud and acquisitive'.

Saint Edmund Arrowsmith

The Catholic Truth Society has published this short biography of St Edmund Arrowsmith by Fr John Hogan.

Saint Margaret Clitherow pamphlet

Saint Margaret Clitherow (1556 – 25 March 1586) is an English saint and martyr of the Roman Catholic Church, sometimes called "the Pearl of York". She was pressed to death for refusing to enter a plea to the charge of harbouring Catholic priests, and canonised in 1970 by Pope Paul VI.